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Thứ Hai, 15 tháng 7, 2013

RADIOGRAPHICS 7-8/2013


1.     Abstract 1
        Breast Imaging:
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Interactive Case Review of Radiologic and Pathologic Findings from Breast Biopsy: Are They Concordant? How Do I Manage the Results? Radiographics July-August 2013 33:4 E149-E152; Christopher P. Ho,    Jennifer E. Gillis,    Kristen A. Atkins,     Jennifer A. Harvey,     and Brandi T. Nicholson
doi:10.1148/rg.334125123
Recognizing and characterizing microcalcifications, masses, and areas of asymmetry with the BI-RADS lexicon and determining radiologic-pathologic concordance are essential in managing suspicious breast lesions.
2.     Abstract 2  Genitourinary Imaging:
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Cysts of the Lower Male Genitourinary Tract: Embryologic and Anatomic Considerations and Differential Diagnosis Radiographics July 2013 33:4 1125-1143; Haytham M. Shebel,    Hashim M. Farg,    Orpheus Kolokythas,    and Tarek El-Diasty
doi:10.1148/rg.334125129
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Cysts of the lower male genitourinary tract are discussed in terms of the embryologic development and normal anatomy of the tract and the MR imaging and transrectal US features of these cysts.
3.     Abstract 3       CME ARTICLE Musculoskeletal Imaging:
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Continuing Medical Education: US of the Elbow: Indications, Technique, Normal Anatomy, and Pathologic Conditions Radiographics July-August 2013 33:4 E125-E147; Gabrielle P. Konin,  Levon N. Nazarian,  and Daniel M. Walz
doi:10.1148/rg.334125059

The technique of elbow US is discussed, normal US anatomy of the elbow is described, and the US appearances of common pathologic conditions of the elbow are reviewed along with potential US-guided treatment options.
1.     Abstract 1 of 3  Breast Imaging
Interactive Case Review of Radiologic and Pathologic Findings from Breast Biopsy: Are They Concordant? How Do I Manage the Results?
The number of imaging-guided percutaneous breast biopsies performed has steadily increased as imaging techniques have improved. Percutaneous biopsy is becoming more commonplace and supplanting excisional biopsy as the preferred diagnostic tool. The radiologist’s role in caring for patients who undergo breast biopsy extends beyond imaging to identifying lesions for biopsy and then performing the procedure. Radiologists must also be cognizant of radiologic-pathologic correlation to determine whether biopsy results are concordant with imaging findings and make management recommendations. Management of microcalcifications, masses, and areas of asymmetry begins with recognizing and characterizing the findings with the proper Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. Determining concordance between imaging findings and histologic results is equally important. The decision to recommend surgical excision or short-term follow-up relies heavily on whether the histologic diagnosis correlates with the imaging findings, a determination that is part of the radiologist’s responsibilities if he or she performs the biopsy. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.334125123/-/DC1.
2.     Abstract 2 of 3 Genitourinary Imaging
Cysts of the Lower Male Genitourinary Tract: Embryologic and Anatomic Considerations and Differential Diagnosis
Cysts of the lower male genitourinary tract are uncommon and usually benign. These cysts have different anatomic origins and may be associated with a variety of genitourinary abnormalities and symptoms. Various complications may be associated with these cysts, such as urinary tract infection, pain, postvoiding incontinence, recurrent epididymitis, prostatitis, and hematospermia, and they may cause infertility. Understanding the embryologic development and normal anatomy of the lower male genitourinary tract can be helpful in evaluating these cysts and in tailoring an approach for developing a differential diagnosis. There are two main groups of cysts of the lower male genitourinary tract: intraprostatic cysts and extraprostatic cysts. Intraprostatic cysts can be further classified into median cysts (prostatic utricle cysts, müllerian duct cysts), paramedian cysts (ejaculatory duct cysts), and lateral cysts (prostatic retention cysts, cystic degeneration of benign prostatic hypertrophy, cysts associated with tumors, prostatic abscess). Extraprostatic cysts include cysts of the seminal vesicle, vas deferens, and Cowper duct. A variety of pathologic conditions can mimic these types of cysts, including ureterocele, defect resulting from transurethral resection of the prostate gland, bladder diverticulum, and hydroureter and ectopic insertion of ureter. Accurate diagnosis depends mainly on the anatomic location of the cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal ultrasonography (US) are excellent for detecting and characterizing the nature and exact anatomic origin of these cysts. In addition, transrectal US can play an important therapeutic role in the management of cyst drainage and aspiration, as in cases of prostatic abscess.
© RSNA, 2013
3.     Abstract 3 of 3 Musculoskeletal Imaging Continuing Medical Education
US of the Elbow: Indications, Technique, Normal Anatomy, and Pathologic Conditions
The elbow, a synovial hinge joint, is a common site of disease. Ultrasonography (US) has become an important imaging modality for evaluating pathologic conditions of the elbow. This powerful imaging tool has the advantages of outstanding spatial resolution, clinical correlation with direct patient interaction, dynamic assessment of disease, and the ability to guide interventions. Unlike most other imaging modalities, US allows the contralateral elbow to be imaged simultaneously, providing an internal control and comparison with normal anatomy. A useful approach to US evaluation of the elbow is to divide it into four compartments: anterior, lateral, medial, and posterior. US of the elbow has varied clinical applications, including evaluation and treatment of lateral and medial epicondylitis, imaging of biceps and triceps musculotendinous injuries, evaluation of ulnar collateral ligament laxity, diagnosis of joint effusions and intraarticular bodies, and evaluation of peripheral nerves for neuropathy and subluxation. US can also be used to evaluate soft-tissue masses about the elbow. Knowledge of the normal US anatomy of the elbow, familiarity with the technique of elbow US, and awareness of the US appearances of common pathologic conditions of the elbow along with their potential treatment options will optimize radiologists’ diagnostic assessment and improve patient care. Supplemental material available at http://radiographics.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/rg.334125059/-/DC1.
©RSNA, 2013

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